Foreign Born

Summary: The immigrant and U.S.-born share of the total population by race and ancestry, and the racial composition of the immigrant and U.S.-born populations. Data for 2010 and 2018 represent five-year averages (e.g. 2014-2018).

Data Source(s): IPUMS NHGIS, University of Minnesota, www.nhgis.org, 1860-1990 Decennial Census summary files; GeoLytics, Inc., 2000 Long Form in 2010 Boundaries; U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 and 2018 American Community Survey 5-year Summary Files; IPUMS USA, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org, 2000 5% sample, 2010 and 2018 American Community Survey 5-year. 

Universe: All people.

Methods: The number and percentage of U.S.- and foreign-born populations were calculated by race and ancestry for each year and geography. See the methodology page for other relevant notes.

Notes: 

  • The terms “immigrant” and “foreign born” refer to all people who identify as being born abroad, outside of the United States, to non-American parents. 
  • Latinos include people of Hispanic origin of any race and all other groups exclude people of Hispanic origin.
  • Data for 2010 and 2018 represent 2006-2010 and 2014-2018 averages, respectively.
  • Data prior to 2000 are only available for counties and statewide.

Immigration Status

Summary: The composition of the immigrant population by immigration status, race, ancestry and age group. Data represent a 2014-2018 average. Immigration status is estimated based on an approach developed by the Equity Research Institute. 

Data Source(s): Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, IPUMS USA, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year sample. 

Universe: All immigrants.

Methods: The number and percentage of the immigrant population were calculated by immigration status, race, ancestry and age group for each geography. The categories for immigration status include immigrants, undocumented immigrants, lawful permanent residents and naturalized U.S. citizens. See the methodology page for other relevant notes.

Notes:

  • Latinos include people of Hispanic origin of any race and all other groups exclude people of Hispanic origin.
  • Data represent a 2014-2018 average.
  • Immigration status is estimated using a probability model (not self-reported). See here for details.
     

Mixed-status Families

Summary: The number and share of residents who are undocumented or living with one or more undocumented family members by immigration status, race, ancestry and age group, and the number and share of children living with an undocumented parent. Data represent a 2014-2018 average. Immigration status is estimated based on an approach developed by the Equity Research Institute.

Data Source(s): Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, IPUMS USA, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year sample.

Universe: All people.

Methods: The number of undocumented family members living in the same household was calculated for each survey respondent by immigration status, race, ancestry and age group for each geography. See the methodology page for other relevant notes.

Notes:

  • Latinos include people of Hispanic origin of any race and all other groups exclude people of Hispanic origin.
  • Data represent a 2014-2018 average.
  • Immigration status is estimated using a probability model (not self-reported). See here for details.

Recency of Arrival

Summary: The composition of the immigrant population by the number of years they have lived in the U.S. by immigration status, race and ancestry. Data represent a 2014-2018 average. Immigration status is estimated based on an approach developed by the Equity Research Institute.

Data Source(s): Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, IPUMS USA, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year sample.

Universe: All immigrants.

Methods: The composition of the immigrant population by recency of arrival in the U.S. was calculated by immigration status, race, and ancestry for each geography. The survey question is worded “When did this person come to live in the United States? If this person came to live in the United States more than once, print latest year.” Therefore, the question seeks to identify when an immigrant arrived in the U.S. to live and not simply when they last arrived from a trip abroad. See the methodology page for other relevant notes.

Notes:

  • Latinos include people of Hispanic origin of any race and all other groups exclude people of Hispanic origin.
  • Data represent a 2014-2018 average.
  • Immigration status is estimated using a probability model (not self-reported). See here for details.

Refugee Arrivals

Summary: The number and composition of refugee arrivals since 2002 by year and country of origin. Note that counts by geography are based on the initial destination city and do not take into consideration subsequent migration within the U.S. 

Data Source(s): Refugee Processing Center, U.S. Department of State Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, Interactive Reporting, https://www.wrapsnet.org/admissions-and-arrivals/.

Universe: All refugees who arrived in California from 2002-2019.

Methods: The number of refugee arrivals was calculated by country of origin for each year and geography. Source data by city included city neighborhoods with recognizable names. Data was aggregated into cities and places consistent with Census definitions and subsequently aggregated into counties. Some countries of origin were aggregated into broader groups reflecting large geographic regions. For breakdowns other than the Trend breakdown, data were aggregated into five-year groupings (2002-2006, 2007-2011, 2012-2016, 2017-2019) and a total for all years (2002-2019). See the methodology page for other relevant notes.

Notes: 

  • Data was downloaded and analyzed from the Interactive Reporting section of the Refugee Processing Center’s website in January of 2020. As of October 2020, that tool is no longer available. The most equivalent source of the same data can be found under Admissions Reports on their website.
  • Counts by geography are based on the initial destination city and do not take into consideration subsequent migration within the U.S.
  • No data available for sub-counties (CPUMAs).
  • The full list of nationalities available from the Refugee Processing Center (RPC) data are listed below. For the purposes of the California Immigrant Data Portal, the full list of nationalities were aggregated into broader groups. The table below shows how each nationality in the RPC data was aggregated into detailed and broad groupings for the California Immigrant Data Portal (CIDP).